16 posts categorized "Housing-Educating"

August 27, 2015

WEBINAR: Expanding Housing and Services for LGBT Older People

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Expanding Housing and Services for LGBT Older People
9/24/2015 | 2:00 - 3:30 pm EST
Register Here

Hosted by SAGE and Enterprise Community Partners, this free webinar features panelists who will discuss the topic of LGBT-friendly housing and strategies to expand housing opportunities for LGBT elders.

 

Due to higher levels of financial insecurity and a general lack of affordable housing, many LGBT elders find that they cannot afford homes in the communities they may have lived in for years. Others face harassment and intimidation in their homes and in long-term care settings from aging professionals, other residents, and even their own family members. In recent years, LGBT aging advocates have begun addressing these housing insecurities through a variety of approaches, including developing LGBT-specific housing; working with local housing providers to educate them about LGBT issues and their rights; informing LGBT elders about their rights under the Fair Housing Act; developing innovative programs such as "homesharing"; and connecting LGBT elders to LGBT-friendly services, including housing supports, in their distinct geographic communities.

Join us September 24 for an outstanding panel of policy leaders and providers as they discuss expanding programs and services to address the significant housing challenges faced by LGBT older people including: supportive services for aging in place, friendly visiting, senior centers and community programs, and information and referral services.

Aging service providers and LGBT older adults interested in learning about what types of services and programs are available across the country are encouraged to participate!

Panelists: Mya Chamberlin, Director of Community Services, Friendly House Inc. (home of SAGE Metro Portland); Cheryl Gladstone, Senior Program Director, Enterprise Community Partners, Inc.;  Daniel Tietz, Chief Special Services Officer, New York City Human Resources Administration; Catherine Thurston, Senior Director of Programs, SAGE; and Serena Worthington, Director of National Field Initiatives, SAGE. 

June 23, 2015

Training Housing Providers in LGBT Cultural Competency

15710716766_5332422e92_oWe are excited to announce that there are a few spots available in our special housing webinar with Enterprise Community Partners on Thursday, June 25 from 2-3:30 PM EST. This webinar will provide an interactive introduction to the culture, needs, and concerns of LGBT older adults, including why this elder population often is deterred from accessing needed services and supports. Anyone interested in learning about LGBT cultural competency with regards to housing needs is invited to join in and it's FREE! Register today!

Ask yourself a few questions. Where would you be without safe, secure housing? What if you couldn’t truly be yourself at home, fearing judgement or even abuse? How would you feel in the face of impending eviction? Many LGBT older people are faced with these questions every day and this webinar will attempt to shed light on their circumstances and what housing providers can do to help.  For more information, check out our national initiative to address the LGBT older adult housing crisis.

Training Housing Providers in LGBT Cultural Competency
June 25, 2015, 2:00 p.m. EST
Register Here
An interactive introduction to the culture, needs, and concerns of LGBT older adults, including why this elder population often is deterred from accessing needed services and supports.

June 2, 2015

Let's Talk About Housing!

Where would you be without safe, secure housing? What if you couldn’t truly be yourself at home, fearing judgement or even abuse? How would you feel in the face of impending eviction? Many LGBT older people are faced with these questions every day.  With that in mind, SAGE has launched the first national initiative to address the LGBT older adult housing crisis.

In the coming months, we'll offer a series of 90-minute webinars to explore this complicated issue:

Training Housing Providers in LGBT Cultural Competency
June 25, 2015, 2:00 p.m. EST
Register Here
An interactive introduction to the culture, needs, and concerns of LGBT older adults, including why this elder population often is deterred from accessing needed services and supports.

Expanding Housing and Services for LGBT Older People
September 24, 2015 2:00 p.m. EST
Register Here
An outstanding panel of program leaders and providers discuss expanding relevant supports and  services to address the significant housing challenges faced by LGBT older people.

Making Senior Housing Policy LGBT-Friendly
November 5, 2015 2:00 p.m. EST
Register Here
A discussion about how advocates and the federal government can facilitate the creation of welcoming, affordable, and supportive housing for all LGBT older adults, regardless of income.  

We'll schedule further webinars in 2016. For more information about any of these events, email Serena Worthington, SAGE’s Director of National Field Initiatives, at sworthington@sageusa.org. 

Take part in one or all of these conversations, and join SAGE in the fight to secure safe, supportive, affordable housing for LGBT older people across the United States! 

-- Posted by Kira Garcia

 

 

October 8, 2014

New National Study: Five Things You Should Know About Aging and LGBT People

Today’s post is from Robert Espinoza, Senior Director for Public Policy and Communications at SAGE. It was originally featured on The Huffington Post. Follow Robert on Twitter.

Much has been written about the growing number of older people in this country (as the baby boom generation rapidly ages), as well as the incremental shift in favorable policies and attitudes toward certain segments of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) population. However, less public attention has been placed on the intersection of these two trends: how LGBT people experience aging, beginning in midlife all the way through later life.

BLOGCovernew research reportOut and Visible: The Experiences and Attitudes of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Older Adults, Ages 45-76—sheds new light on these issues. Based on a 2014 nationally representative study of more than 1,800 LGBT people and more than 500 non-LGBT people, Out and Visible extensively describes how LGBT people feel and experience areas such as healthcare, finance and retirement, support systems, housing and more. The study was commissioned bySAGE and led by Harris Poll.

Here are five things this new study reveals about LGBT older people’s experiences with aging.

1. LGBT older people are concerned about their financial futures and feeling that they need to work much further into later life.  Moreover, many LGBT older people rely largely on their own knowledge and education for retirement planning.

According to this new study, 42 percent of LGBT older people are very or extremely concerned that they will outlive the money they have saved for retirement, as compared to 25 percent of non-LGBT people; and half of all single LGBT older believe they will need to work well beyond retirement age. These findings speak to the importance of public policies that protect and support employment among LGBT people, as well as the critical role that financial planning has on one’s retirement outlook (as two solutions). Additionally, single LGBT people have different needs than partnered LGBT people that merit specific attention (among other characteristics explored in this study).

2. LGBT older people report fearing that if their sexual orientations and gender identities become known by healthcare or long-term care providers, as two examples, they will experience judgment, discrimination and inferior care.

Out and Visible notes that 43 percent of single LGBT older people and 40 percent of LGBT older people age 60 and older say their healthcare providers don't know about their sexual orientations. Two-thirds (65 percent) of transgender older adults fear that they will experience limited access to healthcare as they age. Prior research has documented significant health disparities among LGBT older people, spurred by a combination of poor healthcare access and the stressors of stigma and discrimination. In contrast, candid communication between LGBT people and their providers could play a role in improving their quality of care and ultimately, their overall health and well-being.

3. The support networks of LGBT older people are shrinking, and the housing outlook for many LGBT older people isn't optimistic either.

This new study reveals that 40 percent of LGBT older people report that their support networks have become smaller over time, as compared to 27 percent of non-LGBT people. Additionally, one in eight (13%) LGBT people and one in four (25%) transgender people say they have been discriminated against when searching for housing on the basis of their sexual orientations and gender identities, respectively. Secure housing and a supportive network of friends are essential to all people as they age, especially in preventing poverty and social isolation—yet this study shows that LGBT people might be compromised in this regard.

4. LGBT people are diverse and not a monolith—and this study reveals distinct differences that are relevant to providers, government and the broader private sector.

Two notable examples from this study. According to this study, African American LGBT older people are three times as likely as White or Hispanic LGBT older people to say that people from their churches or faith are part of their support systems. Moreover, transgender older people tend to be more worried about being a burden to their loved ones (48% vs. 32%), and knowing where they will live as they grow older (42% vs. 27%) than their cisgender (non-transgender) peers. The study shows additional differences across income, age, relationship status and more.

5. LGBT older people aspire to take on many of the same activities as their non-LGBT peers—yet this study shows that LGBT people are more likely to want to serve as mentors and many fear what might transpire with these options if their sexual orientations and gender identities become known.

According to the study, LGBT and non-LGBT older people cite similar interests for their retirement years: taking part in leisure activities, travel, volunteering, starting a hobby, working part-time and joining social groups. However, key differences also emerged. According to the study, LGBT older people are twice as likely as non-LGBT older people to envision themselves mentoring others (14% vs. 7%). Also, one in four (27%) LGBT older people and one in three (33%) transgender older people feels that work or volunteer activities will not be open to him/her if others know about his/her sexual orientation and gender identity, respectively. 

This study builds on a growing body of research over the last few years that has increasingly, though insufficiently, studied aging concerns among LGBT older people.The report also offers a host of recommendations for leaders in the public and private sectors, most of which are largely centered on the importance of becoming more responsive to the diversity of LGBT people as they age. We’re all aging, regardless of where we fall on the age spectrum, and we deserve to age into systems that enrich our lives, not hinder them.  In this sense, we can all play a role in building a more equitable society.

April 15, 2014

LGBT Older Adult Housing – A Critical Need

Today's post is from Hilary Meyer, SAGE's Director of National Programs and Director of the National Resource Center on LGBT Aging.

Horizon

LGBT older adults deserve secure, stable and affordable housing, yet often face harassment and intimidation in their homes and in long-term care settings from aging professionals and other residents. This means that many people live in physically and emotionally unhealthy environments that compromise the quality of their lives.

SAGE’s National Resource Center on LGBT Aging (NRC) is running a social media campaign this week to draw attention to this critical issue. Whether you are an older adults yourself, an aging provider looking for more information or an LGBT organization looking for more information on housing needs, we have you covered with webinars, articles, educational videos, publications and more!

A few highlights from our website include:

Safe, inclusive and affordable housing is a key to aging successfully and happily. We urge LGBT people and their allies to education themselves on all aspects of this important topic.

July 10, 2013

LGBT Senior Living: Challenges and Change in Nursing Home Settings

Written by Anila S. Venkat, this post was originally featured on the ElderBranch blog. ElderBranch provides unbiased information on senior care providers. 

BlogpostlivingfacilitiesAs described in ElderBranch’s initial piece on LGBT senior living, elder care facilities and other health care settings are often unwelcoming towards LGBT older adults or insensitive to their needs and circumstances.

As a result, LGBT elders generally tend to delay seeking health care for fear of discrimination and mistreatment. At the same time, they are less likely to rely on family members for caregiving for a variety of reasons. Unfortunately, together, this may lead to LGBT older adults needing institutional care more frequently, or sooner in their lifetimes, as they may find that their health deteriorates more rapidly.

ElderBranch interviewed Hilary Meyer and Aaron Tax of Services & Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE) to explore this issue and discuss SAGE advocacy efforts aimed at encouraging system-wide change.

Hostile Health Care Environments

In its report, LGBT Older Adults and Inhospitable Health Care Environments, SAGE details how health care settings are often challenging environments for LGBT elders. These seniors may face outright discrimination, or it may be that the staff in these settings is not trained to deal with this population of elders.

Though some health care environments are starting to change, the scars of previous negative experiences leave many seniors reluctant to pursue care unless absolutely necessary. In fact, the SAGE report quotes a 2006 study that found that less than half of lesbian and gay Baby Boomers were strongly confident that health care professionals would treat them with dignity and respect.

However, in delaying the pursuit of health care, LGBT older adults often find themselves in a position where their health deteriorates more suddenly and sooner than expected, and then they end up requiring institutional care – such as nursing home care.

Challenges in Nursing Home Settings

In nursing home settings, LGBT seniors often face discrimination not only from staff members, but also from other residents and residents’ family members. Hostility from a variety of angles can lead to LGBT elders keeping to themselves and limiting interaction with others.

Staff members have been known to deny same-sex partner visitations, prevent same-sex couples from sharing rooms and even refuse the participation of a same-sex partner in the medical decision-making of the resident.

When faced with harassment by other residents and their family members, nursing homes are often ill-equipped to confront these situations. Staff members sometimes react by isolating the LGBT individual – which can be devastating for that resident when he or she is already withdrawn and isolated socially.

Effecting Change – SAGE Advocacy

SAGE is very deeply engaged in advocacy efforts to support the needs of LGBT older adults. Though it is difficult to target long-term care settings more generally (assisted living, retirement communities), due to lack of one governing body or set of rules, facilities that accept Medicare or Medicaid funding – such as nursing homes – are more easily addressed.

SAGE advocates on a number of key issues pertaining to care in nursing home settings, which begin to address some of the challenges described above that arise when LGBT seniors access nursing home care.

Cultural Competency Training

It is critical that nursing home staff appreciate the specific needs of LGBT older adults, including recognizing diverse family structures and providing medically appropriate care for transgender people.

In this regard, Aaron Tax explains, “We and our LGBT-aging allies are currently working with CMS [Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services] on an LGBT cultural competency training for employees in long-term care facilities, targeting nursing facilities certified by CMS for Medicare and/or Medicaid and state-licensed residential care facilities. We also believe there are places where LGBT curricula can and should be added to staff trainings or integrated into existing trainings for care providers.”

To this end, SAGE offers comprehensive cultural competency trainings through its National Resource Center on LGBT Aging, for staff at nursing homes and other aging service providers. Interested parties can request a training through the SAGE website.

Updating Forms and Broad Definitions of Family

LGBT people and their families often have difficulty ensuring access for partners and children who do not have legally recognized relationships. For example, LGBT elders should be allowed to list their partners on forms where heterosexual couples list spouses, list their non-biological and non-adoptive children as well, and be permitted visitations from their partners and non-biological/non-adoptive children.

“We and our LGBT-aging allies have recommended that CMS and AoA [Administration on Aging] review and revise existing regulations, as appropriate, to incorporate inclusive definitions of family. We and our LGBT-aging allies have also urged that CMS and AoA take actions to encourage state agencies to review and revise their own regulations and forms as needed,” details Aaron.

The LGBT movement’s efforts in these arenas are evidently paying off. On June 28, 2013, CMS issued amemorandum to State Survey Agency Directors, reiterating resident rights surrounding access and visitation.

The memo states that long-term care facilities must ensure that all visitors be given full and equal visitation privileges. Most significantly, the memo states that residents must be notified of their rights to have visitors on a 24-hour basis, who could include, but are not limited to, spouses (including same-sex spouses), domestic partners (including same-sex domestic partners), other family members, or friends.

While many challenges remain ahead – for example, LGBT older adults need to be able to feel comfortable reporting violations to their rights – these changes represent significant steps in the right direction.